Bad Neighbours: How to Deal with Them

Toronto Life
bad neighbour by moon angel
Good Neighbour / Bad Neighbour by Moon Angel

It doesn’t matter whether you live in a charming and peaceful neighbourhood or in a hectic part of town; there’s always a risk that you won’t get along with your neighbour very well. Nuisances such as loud music, the neighbour’s dogs relieving themselves in front of your house, or the neighbour’s car parked in your space might seem unimportant and trivial; however, on a daily basis they’re real atrocities. Everyone has the right to have a peaceful living environment and if it’s violated by the people living next door, you have to speak up and confront the problem. Here are some tips that should help you to settle disputes with your neighbours.

Communicate With Your Neighbours

You can’t avoid neighbour disputes if you don’t communicate with them. Maintaining a good relationship with your neighbour doesn’t mean that you have to spend all your free time with them, but it’s the best way to prevent conflicts. First of all, you have to know your neighbours so that you can trust and understand them. Conflicts tend to arise much more between strangers and just an occasional chit-chat with your neighbour will significantly decrease the probability of a dispute. This might not be possible in all cases, but even if you don’t talk to your neighbour at all and you’re unable to get along with her or him, you have to bring up the issue. It’s possible that your neighbour isn’t aware of bothering you, so try to approach him in a calm and constructive way rather than being accusatory. Bringing in a possible solution favourable to both sides is a good way to deal with neighbour problems. Don’t forget to show a willingness to compromise. Furthermore, if you’re planning an activity that might be disturbing to your neighbours, let them always know in advance.

Are You The Only One Who Has Problems?

Bad Neighbors by Shawn Allen
Bad Neighbours by Shawn Allen

If discussing the issue with your neighbour doesn’t solve anything, try to find out if anybody else has the same problem with her. It’s possible that you’re not the only one whose life is affected by the nuisance. More people approaching the troublemaker with the same concern might have more influence on her. If you’re part of a condo or community association, try to discuss your issues with them and resolve the dispute more easily and cheaply.

Where to Find Advice Online

People from around the world who have similar neighbour problems discuss their issues and help each other out through online forums and message boards such as Neighbours From Hell and AnnoyingNeighbors.com. These sites offer an abundance of bad neighbour stories that can help you find a solution or realize that your problem is not a big deal.

Mediation

If you and your neighbour aren’t able to resolve the dispute, you might want to get help from a mediation service. An impartial professional trained in dealing with issues such as yours can help you and your neighbour understand each other’s opinions and find a solution. A mediator usually speaks to everyone involved and arranges a meeting between you and your neighbour. The meetings usually don’t last longer than a day and 80 per cent of mediations are settled before going to court with another 5 per cent resolved shortly afterward. The mediator communicates with both parties and sets ground rules for the discussion, makes sure that the views of both sides are heard, and suggests a way to move forward. If both parties are able to agree, they sign a mediation contract, which is not legally binding but which people tend to follow since it’s an arrangement they’ve worked out and signed.

the ADR Institute of Canada
The ADR Institute of Canada

There are communities with free mediations run by volunteers who are educated and instructed on how to resolve issues. Some condo boards offer free mediation that residents have to go through before taking their dispute to court. Furthermore, there are special organizations such as the ADR Institute of Canada that promote mediation nationally and provide a directory of mediators on the websites. The usual fees are between $1,500 to $3,000 for a half-day to full-day session and the cost is usually split between both neighbours.

Court

Taking your dispute to court is the last resort after you’ve tried all other means of solving the problem. Be prepared to provide evidence of damages and that you might not speak to your neighbour again. The cost of your lawsuit depends on your province and the size of your claim. If it’s between $5,000 and $25,000, your case will be heard in a small claims court, which means that you must represent yourself without a lawyer. If your claim is higher than $25,000, your case will be heard in Superior Court and you’ll have a lawyer available. It means that if you lose, you’ll have to pay your neighbour’s legal expenses as well as your own, plus the damages you’re required to pay.

Toronto Neighbour Bylaws

Noise

Is your neighbour bothering you with loud stereos, barking dogs, or noisy equipment even after you’ve talked to the person? You should contact 311 and file a complaint about noise that’s in contravention of the noise bylaw. Don’t forget to mention the actual street address when submitting a service request for investigation by Municipal Licensing & Standards. Afterwards, the City might send the occupants of the property a notice advising them that neighbours are being disturbed by their actions and of the possibility for further action through court if the disturbance continues. If the source of the noise is a gathering, party, dispute, yelling, or screaming in the neighbour’s home, the best way to deal with it is to call the police at the time of the occurrence.

Noisy Neighbours by Floyd Wilde
Noisy Neighbours by Floyd Wilde

Animals

The Toronto animal bylaw establishes restrictions on how many pets Torontonians can keep in their homes. Chapter 349 of the Toronto Municipal Code establishes that no one is allowed to keep in any dwelling unit more than six dogs, cats, ferrets, and rabbits, in any combination with the number of dogs capped at three. Furthermore the rules prohibit keeping an animal in an unsanitary condition and the owner is required to provide her pets with adequate and appropriate care, food, water, shelter, exercise, attention, and veterinary care.

The licensing of dogs and registration of cats is obligatory in the City of Toronto. If your dog or cat is found to be unlicensed, you can be issued a ticket for $240, which if unpaid can become a fine of up to $5,000. Toronto Animal Services provide licensing and deals with all important issues concerning animals in Toronto.

If you’re a dog owner, don’t forget to scoop your pet’s poop and keep him on a leash when on public streets, parks, or buildings. A list of off-leash zones is provided by Toronto Parks, Forestry & Recreation on their web pages.

Fences

According to Toronto fence bylaws, you do not need a permit to build a fence unless it’s for a swimming pool enclosure. However, there are some restrictions, so contact your local buildings office before you build. A line fence, located on the property boundary, belongs to both property owners. People don’t have to share the cost of a fence but are both responsible for keeping it in good shape, and they cannot take it down without the permission of the second party. To help resolve any disputes between property owners, the City of Toronto has set up an impartial arbitration process under the Provincial Line Fences Act, R.S.O. 1990, Chapter L.17.

Trees

My Neighbours by Dennis Crowley
My Neighbours by Dennis Crowley

The Private Tree Bylaw was adopted to protect trees situated on private property and to assist in sustaining the urban forest in the City as well as to educate individuals with respect to tree protection measures and alternatives to tree injury and destruction. It regulates the injury or removal of privately owned trees that measure 30 centimetres in diameter or more as measured at 1.4 metres above ground level.

If your neighbour’s tree branches hang over your property, you can cut and trim them, but only up to the property line. Furthermore, if your tree damages your neighbour’s property, you aren’t responsible unless you caused the damage intentionally or through negligence. That means that you’re responsible for the damage if you didn’t take reasonable care or you were warned or knew the tree was damaged or diseased and could fall.

<< Not everything is lost yet? Read how you can improve your relationships in the neighbourhood. Or check out part 2 where we resolve some of issues our readers complained about >>

100 thoughts on “Bad Neighbours: How to Deal with Them

May 2, 2017 at 6:18 pm
Jacquelyn says:

Neighbor and newly licenced teenage son are careless with their parking and hitting doors and scratching cars when they park to both vehicles that park on either side of them. Video to support. My husband was in our truck when the son hit his mirror. The truck is a year old to the day. My husband asked him to be careful and was told to f*ck off. Approaching mom does no good either. Was told to file a n4 against her. Others in the complex have them and nothing is done about them. She has called animal control on my dog barking, which was unfounded. My house smells of pot leaking from my walls coming from her side, complained nothing was done about it. She has an unregistered business in her home and the management company wants me to make a complaint against it. What do I do when the management company won’t do anything except encourage me to be vindictive?

June 27, 2017 at 3:08 am
Jamie Sarner says:

Hi Jacquelyn,
You have a right to complain to the city. We recently published a part 2 to this article that deals with some of these problems in more detail. You can read it here: https://jamiesarner.com/toronto-real-estate/2017/06/dealing-with-neighbours-2
Hope this helps you find some resolution.
Regards,
Jamie Sarner

May 14, 2017 at 10:25 pm
Marie says:

I live next to horrible people. They have a dog that’s crated all day and night and only let out to go to the bathroom. The dog cries for hours. We were threaten by the man that lives there. Police were and nothing was done. Now his 13 year old daughter harasses out 2 younger daughters and the man constantly stares out his window at me while I’m in my backyard, gives my husband and children horrible looks. We don’t feel comfortable living here. How can we get something done about these people? Police have been to Thier home 3 times in the last 2 months because of the daughter’s bad behaviour. These people live right beside us and bang on the walls on purpose. I was so stress out this past October I went into labour 2 weeks early with my baby girl and had to have an emergency c section because these people stressed me out so badly. Please help. Thanks so much, sincerely, Marie

June 27, 2017 at 3:08 am
Jamie Sarner says:

Hi Marie,
This is a very complex problem. Beside pet problems, there’s a chance you are living next to a bullying neighbours. We recently published a part 2 to this article that deals with some of these problems in more detail. You can read it here: https://jamiesarner.com/toronto-real-estate/2017/06/dealing-with-neighbours-2
Hope this helps you find some resolution.
Regards,
Jamie Sarner

June 3, 2017 at 6:21 pm
Katerelou says:

What do you do with three annoying neighbors? I have one next to me who is renting and they do not care for their lawn. They have BBQs and throw their bones in the backyard causing rats to run in and out of our backyards. We had ask them to split the cost on our fence that separates our backyards due to the fact that it’s not stable and they refuse. We do not have any information on the people who own the house. Then I have on the other side a lady who calls to give anyone and everyone tickets on cars that park on the side of the curb after three hours. She also gets another lady who live a house down to measure people’s driveways when people are home. I find these people ridiculous. Also the lady that calls to ticket people has dogs. Her dog bit mine through the fence. I filed a complaint and she said we will not get a cent out of her cause she knew people in the city of Mississauga. To this day I have not received any information or email back on the case with my dog and it has been three years. Any ideas to deal with the trio that torments our neighborhood?

June 27, 2017 at 3:15 am
Jamie Sarner says:

Hi Katerelou,
We recently published a part 2 to this article that deals with your problem in more detail. You can read it here: https://jamiesarner.com/toronto-real-estate/2017/06/dealing-with-neighbours-2
Hope this helps you find some resolution.
Regards,
Jamie Sarner

June 18, 2017 at 7:43 am
Dean says:

Hi Jamie, I’ve lived in my co-op for 36 years and in this particular apartment for 25, peacefully and quietly. With wonderful downstairs neighbours. Sadly they passed away last year and a new person moved in in December. I was acquainted with this person as he already lived in my building. He was always friendly and nice. He always has a very large dog. This second on is a St. Bernard. The dogs are wonderful and well behaved. Shortly after he moved in he wrote me a note asking me not to water my plants as it was going on his balcony and getting his dog wet. It had rained steadily for about 10 hours that day and my balcony was wet as well. I immediately went down to his apartment to speak to him as I new he was home but he wouldn’t answer the door. I found this strange as I’m not an unfriendly person and I wanted to explain to him about the rain. I ended up writing a note on the back of his explaining the situation and left it at his door along with my phone number if he had any further issues. That seemed to solve things as he issued me a Christmas card and invitation to his house warming and Xmas party. It was the day before the party and I was unable to go and since he gave me his phone number I called and explained this.
In January he started pounding on the walls in the middle of the night waking me up. I could just hear another dog yapping, not his, in one of the other apartments and that’s why he was doing that. It happened several more times and I began to think I would need to talk to him again. However the next time I saw him, I said Hi, and he walked right by me. I know he saw me and recognized me so I found this very strange. I began to think that someone else had complained and he figured it was me so me was angry at me. But I hadn’t complained yet. So my attempts to talk to him were thwarted twice and I decided not to bother. I woke me in the middle of the night another 5 times and then began protesting any noise he figured I was making. Like the maintenance people in the apartment across the hall from me or when I was cleaning the bathroom. The bathroom’s a small awkward space and it’s hard to clean while being absolutely quiet. I would say it’s impossible. That time he banged so hard on something in his bathroom I figured he had done some damage. I waited just over 6 months from the time of his moving in to complain. I had started keeping a diary sometime in March documenting as far as I could remember his past behaviour and now everyday. I had 50 days of documentation before I complained to the co-op board. They spoke to him and when he came home from that meeting he started slamming doors, making as much noise as possible and turned his music up really loud. I’m home most days as I’ve been unemployed since I was laid off 2 years ago. I continued to document him as he started following me around my apartment in his, doing dishes, cleaning, making the bed and would make noises, like tapping on his ceiling or opening and closing cupboard doors. He woke me again twice and then left me another note complaining of the water on his balcony after it had rained. And I started smelling things, like perfume/cologne/hair spray but mostly bug spray. The it started whenever I was in the shower. We have vents in the shower to to help take the moist air out. I taped them up. I’d had enough and complained to the co-op property manager again. This time only 36 days after the first complaint. He didn’t come back from that meeting slamming doors etc. I think because I mentioned that behaviour to the Property Manage. Now it’s perfume while I’m in the shower. Brushing his dog on the balcony and throwing it off so it floats up to mine. This morning I smelled bug spray again. I’ve already got a letter ready to go to the office on Monday only 7 days after the last one. I think this person is a sociopath and am very nervous about running in to him. I keep my phone on record when I enter and leave the building. What a way of life. I have no intention of moving, couldn’t afford it if I wanted to. I’m hoping that with enough complaints they will evict him. I actually don’t want this to happen as I know he has a chronic illness and is on social support. I’m sure he’s unhappy but he’s making me very unhappy. I wish I could talk to his previous neighbours and see if they had these issues with him.

June 27, 2017 at 3:04 am
Jamie Sarner says:

Hi Dean,
Reading this, looks like the problem might be on both sides this time. We recently published a part 2 to this article that deals with some of these problems in more detail. You can read it here: https://jamiesarner.com/toronto-real-estate/2017/06/dealing-with-neighbours-2
Hope this helps you find some resolution.
Regards,
Jamie Sarner

June 20, 2017 at 1:48 am
Chloe says:

Hi I have my upstairs neighbors that constantly fight a lot and throw something hard below my roof it so disturbing I can’t fall alsleep or relaxed in my own apartment. It been going on for a year in a half since they moved in. They also invaded my pravicy when I’m talking to family or friends I can hear them below my roof. I want some advice how to feel comfortable in my own home again and get a good night rest stress free from these wired people.

June 27, 2017 at 3:14 am
Jamie Sarner says:

Hi Chloe,
You have the right to complain to your building or to the city. We recently published a part 2 to this article that deals with some of these problems in more detail. You can read it here: https://jamiesarner.com/toronto-real-estate/2017/06/dealing-with-neighbours-2
Hope this helps you find some resolution.
Regards,
Jamie Sarner

June 26, 2017 at 1:05 pm
s mason says:

Hi Jamie
I purchased a property in Toronto/Scarborough 6 years ago and have had my life made extremely unpleasant by the neighbours to the north. Their behaviours and deeds have been such that I’ve had to document everything and it didn’t matter if I approached calmly, rationally and reasonably, or shouted at them for some of the things they did, or had the police or by-law officers over to speak with them, each and every approach was a guarantee of retaliation and/or some form of abuse (like bullying and harassment). As a single woman on my own I really don’t need any of this so a few years ago I simply stopped having anything to do with them. But things continued. This past spring I had to take them through the court system (it didn’t go all the way to court, it wasn’t that sort of a case) in order to get money from them to fix damage they’d done to my house. They are well known not just for their behaviours and attitudes but also for being quite devious, uncooperative, evasive and, well, completely without honour. During this court process they alleged that they own one foot of property to their south (eg/ onto mine) from the streetline all the way back to the back fence line. Part of this alleged one foot is actually my driveway, beside which they’d built a retaining wall years before I came on to the scene. My driveway and that wall meet. Then there’s a narrow section between the 2 houses which they still allegedly own one foot of, but at the end of that is a gate that leads into the back part of my property. That is open for a short length and then, to my horror, I discovered a small gate attached to the fence that divides the 2 properties along the side back there. This gate is attached by hinges to the fence post but not attached to their house. The wall of their house is kind of in my back yard. There is a narrow piece of concrete, about a foot wide, that they claim they own. The fence along the side is right on the one foot line. Getting back to the open area, someone who lived at my property before very wisely planted 3 spruces and they provide some rather nice privacy. Unfortunately down that side of their wall, near the corner, they’ve got a downspout coming down from the roof. It reaches the ground and has been arranged to go under the gate and run along their side of the fence. As a security measure I placed some largish but not harmful objects by the gate, not touching it or the downspout, in an effort to stop anyone from just entering my property at that point, because that is what would happen. If anyone was to come in, the one foot width of concrete along the ground, that meets the wall of their house, would mean anybody could just access the back of my property and be on it. Trespassing. Security and safety issue. I’m in the process of trying to have a discussion with, and hiring, a surveying firm to do an updated survey of my property but have concerns about this one foot property line issue, and in particular the part that is my driveway as well as the back part. I’ve heard about properties in the area which may be on a Registered Plan of Subdivision but don’t know what that means, or if it would prevent me from having the surveyor move the line in the 2 affected sections back so that I actually own them. Even if it means that my property abuts directly next to theirs at the back and with the driveway. Recently one of the people next door opened up the gate and shoved over the objects I had there as deterrents and cut the string (when I found the gate there’d been some string tied around it and the downspout to keep it closed…I didn’t put it there, but I was so alarmed at finding this situation that I replaced the string….which has been cut a few times….I just keep replacing it for my own safety and security and that of my property). I have never once been in any agreement nor given consent for anybody to enter that part of the property from that gate or from anywhere else. In fact, I’ve made a point of either telling them myself, somehow, or having it communicated to them via other means, that they need to completely keep away. The situation is ridiculous because they seem to think they can do whatever they want and not only abuse me and my property, but they can be and are nice as pie to everyone else in that area. So, not a pleasant situation, I’m doing the best that I can but being on my own and now suffering healthwise because of this (huge anxieties, trepidation, and being physically sick) it is very very hard. Just wondering, after this really long note, whether you can offer any insights about this business of property being on Registered Plan of Subdivision and, if so, whether a surveyor might be able to move property lines closer to the neighbouring property. Also if it turns out that the width of my property isn’t what was noted in the documentation, and I get that confirmed, I would plan on raising the issue with MPAC with a view to reducing my property taxes. In the meantime, not sure what else I can do. Putting up a “Do Not Enter” sign isn’t really possible because there’s no real way to attach it plus they’d probably open that little back gate, cut the string, shove the deterrents over again, and cut the sign down. Really super nice bunch! I’m also in the process of trying to find a contractor to do a few fix ups of my property so I can sell it, but that opens up a whole other can of worms (such as where am I going to live???!). So, any insights, including whether you thing Toronto Building might be able to answer some of my questions and short of going to a lawyer or to Title (I tried that but don’t understand it so first need to understand), or anything would be most appreciated. Really, this sort of behaviour towards one neighbour makes one feel targeted on top of everything else, and this after they were royally lectured by the adjudicator that we’re neighbours, they need to learn to get along. They can get along with everyone else, what’s the deal with me!
Thanks.

June 27, 2017 at 2:59 am
Jamie Sarner says:

Hi s mason,

A registered plan of subdivision is a legal document that shows the exact surveyed boundaries and dimensions of lots on which houses or buildings are to be built. A registered plan of subdivision creates new, separate parcels of land and can be legally used for the sale of lots. It means som houses in your area are planning to subdivide their land or their are planning to build new houses in empty lots nearby.

As for your dispute, you have the right to submit your fence dispute to City of Toronto. We recently published a part 2 to this article that deals with some of these problems in more detail. You can read it here: https://jamiesarner.com/toronto-real-estate/2017/06/dealing-with-neighbours-2

If you are planning a move and are in need of a new realtor, please don’t hesitate to give me a call. We might be able to figure out your living situtation together.

Regards,
Jamie Sarner

June 26, 2017 at 1:17 pm
s mason says:

Hi Jamie
Follow on from the lengthy tale I just left….wanted to add that there is literally no talking to these people, they simply believe they are well above the law in all that they do, including flatly denying responsibility and pointing the finger of blame elsewhere. But lord help anyone who does anything to their property!

July 18, 2017 at 7:27 am
Hanoverian says:

Hi Jamie,
We’re the neighbour someone is complaining about!
We have a two-year-old son who is fairly average and going through the typical “terrible twos”. Our neighbour has complained about his crying since he was born. Initially I was very open with her, thinking if she got to know us it would ease the annoyance of living next door to a baby. Instead of developing into a friendly relationship it deteriorated into her accusing my mother-in-law of abusing him during the day while we’re at work. When I emphasized that she’s hearing temper tantrums, rather than abuse, she said he has serious psychological issues and needs to see a psychiatrist. Earlier this week she was on the balcony yelling at my husband because my son wanted cake for breakfast at 7:30AM and cried when we (obviously) wouldn’t give it to him. In the end, she complained to the property manager about his crying. I don’t think the noise bylaws cover the terrible twos, but I’m on edge thinking we’ll get evicted or face more conflict with her. A family member is a detective in Peel Region and he recommended I minimize contact with her. Between the accusations, door slamming, and yelling, it’s starting to feel like harassment, but perhaps I’m being sensitive.

What would you do in this case?

I feel as though we’re being accommodating. We’re sending him to daycare come September so she can get some peace during the day and when he has a temper tantrum I carry him into our bedroom, which does not share a wall with her unit. Of course, there are two sides to every story…

Thanks in advance

July 20, 2017 at 6:31 am
Jamie Sarner says:

Hi Hanoverian,
As you say, there are two sides to the story. Maybe your building just has a really thin walls. Some wallpaper or more furniture against the wall is advised for noise minimalisation or cancelation.
When it comes to neighbourhood dispute and/or bullying, there are certain institusion that can help mitigate the problem. Try contacting the property manager and explaining your situation. It’s hard to keep the children quiet because the neighbours might complain, but you can explain to your neighbour (calmly and with as much maturity as you can) that they will grow out of their tantrums and ask them to have a bit of patience.
We recently published a part 2 to this article that deals with some of these problems in more detail. You can read it here: https://jamiesarner.com/toronto-real-estate/2017/06/dealing-with-neighbours-2
Regards,
Jamie Sarner

July 30, 2017 at 10:21 am
Andrea says:

Hi Jamie,
I have a horrible new neighbour who has been smoking us out of the house every day and night since March (it is now the end of July). We are subjected to their smoke for a minimum of 15 hours per day. Although we live in a rural area, our houses are very close to one another and their smoke constantly blows in and around our home. On top of that, we have no air conditioning, so we either have to open the windows and let the smoke in or sit in a muggy, sweltering house with the windows closed. There is no way we can spend much time outdoors.
We have left a letter in their mail box detailing the problems their smoke has been causing and suggesting that perhaps they were just unaware of the issue. We even asked that they restrict their use of the wood stove to the winter months. Unfortunately, after they received the letter, the smoke has only gotten worse.
We called the police, but they said that there was nothing they can do. The municipality only has bylaws for outdoor fires (ironically the bylaw states that an outdoor fire cannot be a nuisance or create a health hazard to neighbours), but the municipality does not have any bylaws for wood stoves or wood furnaces that are inside a home. As we are the only other neighbour close to this house, we also can’t team up with someone else on our street in order to voice our complaint.
What can we do? We can no longer enjoy our property and home. We have to constantly deal with stinging eyes and difficulty breathing and all our household items smell of smoke. Is there no such thing as the right to clean air in your own home?

August 1, 2017 at 12:20 pm
JoAnne says:

I live in a rented half of a duplex with a lovely back yard that I have worked hard to build gardens in. The other half of the duplex was SOLD to a young couple. In short my neighbor told me twice that he was planning on putting a fence up. Unfortunately this did not happen. Now they have built a HUGE play set/fort along with filling the rest of their side with a multitude of toys and play areas. The only child they have is about 18 months old. Recently a number of children..from 4-7 or 8 arrive in the morning and are picked up around late afternoon. Aside from the obvious noise and distress these kids are in my gardens resulting in a lot of damage…I’m pulling my hair out..what can I do?

August 14, 2017 at 7:37 pm
Becky says:

I also have neighbors who play loud music smoke dope and cigarettes out side my door and the window is open my place stinks it all started when my dad and my husband where in the yard my dad was telling my husband about my cousin and his sister dad’s sister has breasts cancer and her son passed away and the other son was in hospital he’s a iv drug user and my husband say so he’s a crack head dad said yes so 4 hours go by and I hear yelling so me and my dad look out side and the neighbor was yelling at my husband saying my daughter asked me what crackhead ment then it just started from there every day they would yell out the window in the yard so I put a camera out side my place and I wrote a 3 page letter to the property manager the next weekend she was out side yelling playing loud music and call us rats and say the property manager did not care to read it because it was not of aney importants and it go on from there from Oct 2016 to present I have 12 police reports for noise and 1 bylaw complaint and a letter from the property manager saying I will be evicted for calling bylaw and in April I gave another 3 page letter and in June another 2pages and I get a call at work and it’s my property manager saying she received 5 letters and I was to find a new place to live eather way but I have video servilance and I have the neighbor say that my husband dose nothing and her husband keep it going I also have video of her saying why do you come out side when we go in ##################################

September 10, 2017 at 5:45 pm
Amee says:

Hi Jamie,
My parents and I are living in an apartment where the neighbours upstairs are terrible. They have 4 small kids (approx. ranging from 2 to 9 years old) and they’re constantly running, banging, screaming, throwing things and making a lot of noise. Their parents yell & scream and they constantly move furniture around. These kids also play in the balcony and make noise there by banging on the metal, yelling, screaming, etc… and it’s extremely disturbing. I’ve tried the following things to resolve this: 1) Speaking to the neighbours directly but they barely speak English and they don’t listen 2) informing their landlord several times – he speaks with them, the noise levels go down for about a week or 2, and then it starts again and the cycle repeats and at times, I don’t event think they listen to their landlord 3) I got the building management to speak to the neighbours, still no luck 4) calling 311, they closed my complaint without any investigation 5) I’ve called the police several times but since it’s not a priority, nothing gets done 6) I’ve gone to the police station to ask for advice and I got told that this is not the police’s problem. What can I do? I am completely lost and don’t have the money to pay for a lawyer to handle this problem. My parents own this unit so there’s no way we can move either. Please help! The noise is unbearable. We would really appreciate your advice.

September 11, 2017 at 3:08 am
Jamie Sarner says:

Hi Amee,
unfortunately, if the authorities are not responding to complains, this really looks like a lawyer-needed kind of situation. I recommend keeping a close record of the disturbances. Video or audio records. Then try to submit your complaint with the evidence that could support it. That should help.
Regards,
Jamie.

September 24, 2017 at 7:51 pm
George Zhao says:

Hi James,
My neighbour has just completed a project of fence poles and wake-way. Yesterday I found that when they changed the fence poles they have pushed the boundary to my side significantly, one tree was on my side now is completely on his side and they started to cut the tree. What can I do to solve the problem? Thank you!
George

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